claireiskoal:

Oxford Skyline by greentool2002 on Flickr.
coffeepluscake:

Oxford. Possibly moving there if I get offered a job

coffeepluscake:

Oxford. Possibly moving there if I get offered a job

lordlavendre:

“St. Aloysius Gonzaga’s Altar Angel” by Pierre Legros the Younger. 

lordlavendre:

“St. Aloysius Gonzaga’s Altar Angel” by Pierre Legros the Younger. 

George the teddy bear is preparing for the role of his life - starring as Aloysius in St John’s Players’ production of Brideshead Revisited. Welcome to his regular bear-blog - a no holds barred look at life from a bear’s-eye point of view…

Theme of the 1981 ITV serial, composed by Geoffrey Burgon

Fonts
In spite of his prejudice, Charles was interested. “I’ve got it, I think, sir; Baskerville.”
“No. Look at the serifs. How about Caslon Old Style?”

Baskerville font is a transitional serif typeface designed in 1757 by John Baskerville (1706–1775) in Birmingham, England. Baskerville is classified as a transitional typeface, positioned between the old style typefaces of William Caslon, and the modern styles of Giambattista Bodoni and Firmin Didot. […] Baskerville’s typeface was the culmination of a larger series of experiments to improve legibility which also included paper making and ink manufacturing. The result was a typeface that reflected Baskerville’s ideals of perfection, where he chose simplicity and quiet refinement. His background as a writing master is evident in the distinctive swash tail on the uppercase Q and in the cursive serifs in the Baskerville Italic. The refined feeling of the typeface makes it an excellent choice to convey dignity and tradition. […] The font is used widely in documents issued by the University of Birmingham. A modified version of Baskerville is also prominently used in the Canadian government’s corporate identity program—namely, in the ‘Canada’ wordmark.


Baskerville tried to improve upon Caslon Old Style by increasing the contrast between thick-and-thin strokes, making serifs sharper and more tapered, and shifting the axis of rounded letters to vertical.

Caslon refers to a number of serif typefaces designed by William Caslon I (1692–1766), and various revivals thereof.

Caslon shares the irregularity characteristic of Dutch Baroque types. It is characterized by short ascenders and descenders, bracketed serifs, moderately-high contrast, robust texture, and moderate modulation of stroke. The A has a concave hollow at the apex, the G is without a spur. Caslon’s italics have a rhythmic calligraphic stoke. Characters A, V, and W have an acute slant. The lowercase italic p, q, v, w, and z all have a suggestion of a swash.

Take a tour of Castle Howard in North Yorkshire England

keldrome:

Thought I’d post some of my own pictures. :3

keldrome:

Thought I’d post some of my own pictures. :3

The first part of the radio drama (others can be found in the Related section).

sleepless-:

Oxford, England

sleepless-:

Oxford, England

TV: Brideshead Regurgitated

Is the cult of Brideshead among Cantabridgians harmless fun, or does it conceal a regressive social agenda? Daniel Janes investigates…

Read More

The chapel at Charles’s school

was huge, bare, and still unfinished, one of the great monuments of the Oxford Movement and the Gothic revival.

The Oxford Movement was a movement of High Church Anglicans, eventually developing into Anglo-Catholicism. The movement, whose members were often associated with the University of Oxford, argued for the reinstatement of lost Christian traditions of faith and their inclusion into Anglican liturgy and theology. They conceived of the Anglican Church as one of three branches of the Catholic Church.

Canterbury Cathedral
The Gothic Revival (also referred to as Victorian Gothic or Neo-Gothic) is an architectural movement which began in the 1740s in England. Its popularity grew rapidly in the early nineteenth century, when increasingly serious and learned admirers of neo-Gothic styles sought to revive medieval forms, in contrast to the neoclassical styles prevalent at the time.
In English literature, the architectural Gothic Revival and classical Romanticism gave rise to the Gothic novel genre, beginning with Castle of Otranto (1764) by Horace Walpole, 4th Earl of Orford, and inspired a 19th century genre of medieval poetry which stems from the pseudo-bardic poetry of “Ossian”. Poems like “Idylls of the King" by Alfred Tennyson, 1st Baron Tennyson recast specifically modern themes in medieval settings of Arthurian romance. In German literature, the Gothic Revival also had a grounding in literary fashions.
I can’t resist the temptation and will show an example of Gothic revival in my hometown, one of the best I’ve seen ever.
Chesme Church